1.800.252.8227
Direct: 864.234.1024

 
Customer
Resources
OVERVIEW
FOLDING EXAMPLES
GUIDELINES &TIPS
LAYOUT TEMPLATES
INSITE
NEW CUSTOMER APPLICATION
CREDIT APPLICATION
 
Creating Your Layout
This page is to provide helpful tips and to aid you in developing a proper print file. For detailed instructions, please choose the appropriate topic from the links below.

Sections: File Submission Requirements, Fonts, Bleeds, Safe Area, Critical Folds, Overprinting, Transparency and Booklets & Crossover Images
 
File Submission Requirements
  • We require that multiple page documents be created as single pages - not printer's spreads.
  • We require a 1/8" bleed
  • We require a 1/8" safe area
  • We require a 1/8" gutter on all folds
  • All files submitted to us need to be CMYK. If you submit an RGB file, we will convert your RGB file to CMYK and you will be charged for the conversion. All files submitted for Internet printing and all design elements need to be 300 DPI at the final print size.

Fonts
Drawing Applications - convert all of your fonts to paths or curves.

Image Editing Applications - flatten or rasterize your fonts.

Native Files - from any other application please include all fonts with your document, failing to do so may slow down the production time of your proof and increase the cost of your job. Please do not use the style pallet when designing your piece.

PostScript and Tiff - files are all inclusive so no fonts are needed.

EPS - files maintain some of the characteristics of the application they were created in therefore fonts may be needed.

PDFs - most of the time no fonts are required, however on occasion a font will be needed.


Use Font Families – Not the Style Bar – to Enhance your Type
To avoid having your type “reflow” during processing, it is very important that you do not add any style (bold, italic) to the fonts from the “type styles” option in either Mac or Windows. Use fonts from the original font family (i.e. Helvetica Bold or Helvetica Italic).

Screen Font Substitution
Screen font substitution occurs when a font such as "Venice" is available on the printer, but is not installed on your computer. Windows will allow you to choose this font, but will display another font, such as "Times", on the computer screen. The printer device will still print the correct font. The result is a discrepency between what you see on the screen and what is printed. You can often tell which fonts are installed on your computer by opening the Fonts control panel and viewing the list of fonts. Most Windows programs will also display a "TT" icon next to installed fonts, and a printer icon next to fonts installed on the printer device but not installed on your computer. Fonts

To avoid screen font substitution issues use only fonts available on your computer. While not always possible, this solution works best. If you choose fonts that are not installed on your computer, the printed version of these fonts may look different than what you see on screen.

Printer Font Substitution
Printer font substitution occurs when you specify a font that is not installed on your computer, or on your printer device. This can happen if you switch printer drivers after composing a document for the first printer. For instance, if the "Venice" font is installed on the first printer, but not on your computer, the first printer could still print out the correct font. If you then switch printer drivers to one that does not have "Venice" installed, the second printer will substitute another font in place of the missing font. In this case, Windows will substitute a font on your screen and when printing. If you are lucky, the same font will be substituted in both cases, but there is no guarantee that this will be the case.

Word Wrapping
Word wrapping occurs when the flow of text changes when you switch printer drivers. This change could be as small as a single word at the end of one line wrapping to the beginning of the next line, or as large as reflowing your entire document. When you switch printer drivers, the document is automatically reformatted to meet the requirements of the new printer. Several factors can cause word wrapping changes, including different margin requirements, font substitution, and printer resolution.


Bleeds
If your document contains images or colors that extend to the edge of the page, it is considered a document with bleeds.

Bleed

To understand bleeds you need to know a little about the printing process. When paper moves through a press it shifts a little from side to side. The movement is very slight and in most cases not noticeable. It does start to become apparent when you are printing a document that has a design element that prints all the way up to the edge of the document. Lets use a 2” x 3.5” business card with a blue background for an example. If you are printing your card at 2” x 3.5” and the paper shifts 1/64” of an inch to the right during printing, then you will have 1/64” of white on the left. If you card moves 1/64” to the bottom you will have 1/64” of white on the top. Over the years the printing industry has a trick to compensate for the movement of the paper. The trick is to extend your background color past the cut edge of your document. When this is done you have enough color so the white is cut off. This extra color that extends past the cut edge of your document is what is known as a bleed in the printing industry. Example - Lets say you are printing the same 2” x 3.5” business cards with a blue background, however this time your card is set up at the size of 2.25” x 3.75”. You have extended your blue color .125” past each edge of your business card. Now when your card shifts 1/64” to the left there is enough bleed on the right to cover the shift. If your card shifts 1/64” to the bottom then there is enough color to cover the top. Once the printing is done, we cut your 2.25” x 3.75” business cards down to 2” x 3.5”. The end result is you have a stack of 2” x 3.5” business cards and no white spaces around the outside. We ask that customers provide a 1/8” or .125” bleed on documents that bleed. This .125” bleed will make your file size .25” larger than the final size of your document. Lets say you are printing an 8.5” x 11” Product Sheet that bleeds. If you add .125” bleed to the left and .125” bleed to the right and then do the same top and bottom, the end result is document that is 8.75” x 11.25”.


Safe Area
Please read the above section about bleeds first. To understand a Safe Area you need to know a little about the printing process. When paper moves through a press it shifts a little from side to side. The movement is very slight and in most cases not noticeable. It does start to become apparent when you have a design element that is too close to the cut edge of your document. You also run the risk of part of your design element being cut if it is to close to the edge. To help hide the fact that the paper has shifted and to keep your design elements from getting cut we ask that you keep all of your elements, that do not bleed, a pre-determined distance away from the cut edge. The pre-determined distance is what we call a safe area. We ask that customers provide a safe area of .125” on all products. Example – If you are printing a 2” x 3.5” business card that does not bleed, you should contain your design elements to 1.75” x 3.25”. This will leave a blank space of .125” on all sides of your business card. This will help hide the fact that the paper shifted and will keep parts of your design from being cut off.

Safe Area


Critical Folds
To understand Critical Folds you need to know a little about the printing process. When paper moves through a press it shifts a little from side to side. The movement is very slight and in most cases not noticeable. It does start to become apparent when you have a design element that is too close to a fold. To help hide the fact that the paper has shifted we ask that you keep all of your elements a pre-determined distance away from the fold. The pre-determined distance is what we call a gutter. We ask that customers provide a gutter of .125”. The .125” gutter needs to be on both sides of the fold. It is OK to extend a background image or color across a fold as long as the background image does not start or stop within .125” of the fold. If you have a document to print that has design elements that start and stop on a fold OR are closer than .125” to a fold then it is considered a document with Critical Folds. We will make every effort to maintain your folds as you have requested, however we do not guarantee critical folds. Gate and Double Gate Folds - Please be aware that there needs to be a minimum of .125" space where the two inside folds meet. We will do our best to line up all folds, but do not guarantee them. Not having this buffer will cause the paper to buckle and dogear in the fold.

Gatefold Preview


Overprinting
In the past, certain objects were set to overprint to avoid the need for trapping and avoid gaps between touching colors. However, our automated system accounts for these issues and makes it unnecessary to set objects to overprint. We recommend that all overprinting objects be turned off before you submit your files. We will not be held responsible for errors occuring due to overprinting objects.

Most often, you won't even notice when proofing your pdf proof. If using standard Acrobat settings, your proof will look accurate and the printed product will not. When reviewing your proof, be sure that your Acrobat Overprint Preview setting is enabled and that you're using the most current version of Acrobat.
Enabling Overprint Preview:
Mac Instructions - With the PDF open, choose Advanced > Print Production > Overprint Preview.
PC Instructions - With the PDF open, choose:
• Edit > Preferences > Page Display > Use Overprint Preview: "Always".

See the samples below:

Pdf Proof
WITHOUT
Overprint Preview
Pdf Proof
WITH
Overprint Preview
Printed Product

Transparency
A lot of printers are discouraging the use of transparency effects in your files. We have addressed all concerns regarding this issue and have no problems receiving these files. This is another step we've taken to meet your customers' demands.

Booklets & Crossover Images
To understand Crossover Images you need to know a little about the printing process and how booklets are made. We are going to use a 12 page, 8.5” x 5.5” finished size booklet as an example. When paper moves through a press it shifts a little from side to side. The movement is very slight and in most cases not noticeable. It does start to become apparent when you have a design element that is too close to a fold. If you are printing a booklet there are two sizes you need to be aware of, the flat size and the finished size of the booklet. Printers create an 8.5” x 5.5” booklet (finished size) by printing 8.5” x 11” sheets (flat size). We are going to number the pages on our booklet as follows; the front cover is page 1, first inside left page is page two; the first inside right page is page three. This continues through the book until your reach the back cover, which is page 12. One 8.5” x 11” sheet printed on both sides creates four 5.5” x 8.5” pages. Two 8.5” x 11” sheets create 8 pages. Three 8.5” x 11” sheet create 12 pages. On the first side of first 8.5” x 11” sheet, the front cover, page one, will take up the right 8.5” x 5.5”. The back cover, page 12, will take up the left 8.5” x 5.5” half of the sheet. Note – page 1 and 12 are on the same 8.5 x 11 sheet. On the second side of the first 8.5" x 11" sheet the left side will be page 2 and the right side will be page 11. The second 8.5” x 11” sheet will have pages 3 and 10 on one side. Pages 4 and 9 will be on the other. The third 8.5” x 11” sheet will have pages 5 and 8 on one side. Pages 6 and 7, the centerfold, will be on the other. This is what is known as printer spreads. Each of the three 8.5” x 11” sheets will be folded to 8.5” x 5.5”. Then they will be collated and stitched to make a 12-page booklet. Now, lets say when you open the cover of your booklet and are looking at pages 2 and 3 you want your customer to see a motorcycle rider taking up both pages. To accomplish this you will need to print the left half, page 2, of the motorcycle rider on the first 8.5” x 11” sheet. You then will need to print the right side of the motorcycle rider, page 3, on the second 8.5” x 11” sheet. So, one image, the motorcycle rider, is being printed on two separate pieces of paper. Those two pieces of paper are then folded and stitched together to make one big image. This is what is known as a Crossover Image. We will make every effort to maintain your Crossover Images as you have requested, however we do not guarantee them.

Booklets and Crossover Images

 

Related Resources
Contact Support
Design Services
Prepress Services
Mailing & Variable Data Services
303 Haywood Road, Greenville, SC 29607
Copyright © 2007-2008 Indexx. All riights reserved.